The Root of the World, by Roger Bacon (Pseudo), 13-17th Cen.

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[1] truly our dissolution, is only the reducing of the hard body into a liquid form
~ The Root of the World, by Roger Bacon (Pseudo), 13-17th Cen.

[2] Also another philosopher, in his Breveloquium saith, as there are three things in a natural egg, viz., the shell, the white, and the yolk, so likewise there are three things corresponding to the philosophers’ stone, the glass vessel, the white liquor, and the citrine body. And as of the yolk and white, with a little heat, a bird is made, (the shell being whole, until the coming forth or hatching of the chicken), so it is in the work of the philosophers’ stone.
~ The Root of the World, by Roger Bacon (Pseudo), 13-17th Cen.

[3] The vessel being well and perfectly closed, and never so much as once opened till the perfection or end of the work; so that you see the vessel is to be kept close, that the spirit may not get out and vanish. Therefore saith Rhasis, keep thy vessel and its junctures close and firm, for the conservation of the spirit. And another saith, close they vessel well, and as you are not to cease from the work, or let it cool, so neither are you to make too much haste, neither by too great a heat, nor too soon opening of it. You must take special care that the humidity, which is the spirit, gets not out of the vessel; for then you will have nothing but a dead body remaining, and the work will come to nothing.
~ The Root of the World, by Roger Bacon (Pseudo), 13-17th Cen.

[4] you are to understand that the body is to be dissolved with the spirit; --- with which they are mixed by an easy and gentle decoction, so that the body may be spiritualized by it. Ascanius also saith, a gentle fire gives health, but too much or great a heat will not conserve or unite the elements, but on the contrary divide them, waste the humidity, and destroy the whole work.
~ The Root of the World, by Roger Bacon (Pseudo), 13-17th Cen.

[5] the gentle or temperate fire is that only which completes the mixture, makes thick, and perfects the work
~ The Root of the World, by Roger Bacon (Pseudo), 13-17th Cen.

[6] in the beginning of the mixture, you ought to mix the elements, being sincere and made pure, clean and rectified with a gentle fire, by a slow and natural digestion, and to beware of too much fire, till you know they are conjoined.
~ The Root of the World, by Roger Bacon (Pseudo), 13-17th Cen.

[7] by a temperate and gentle heat continued, you must make the pure and perfect body.
~ The Root of the World, by Roger Bacon (Pseudo), 13-17th Cen.

[8] Notwithstanding the philosophers have subtily delivered themselves, and clouded their instructions with enigmatical and typical phrases and words, to the end that their art might not only be hidden and so continued, but also be had in the greater veneration. Thus they advise to decoct, to commix, and to conjoin, to sublime, to bake, to grind, and to congeal; to make equal, to putrefy, to make white, and to make red; of all which things, the order, management, and way of working is all one, which is only to decoct.
~ The Root of the World, by Roger Bacon (Pseudo), 13-17th Cen.

[9] digest, and digest again, and be not weary; the most exquisite and industrious artist can never attain to perfection by too much haste, but only by a long and continual decoction and digestion, for so nature works, and art must in some measure imitate nature.
~ The Root of the World, by Roger Bacon (Pseudo), 13-17th Cen.

[10] continue it upon a temperate or gentle balneo, so long till it be perfectly dissolved into water, and made impalpable, and that the whole tincture be extracted into the blackness, which is the sign of its dissolution.
~ The Root of the World, by Roger Bacon (Pseudo), 13-17th Cen.

[11] between the white and the red appear all colours, even to the utmost imagination. --- For the varieties of which the philosophers have given various names, and almost innumerable; some for obscuring it, some for envy’s sake. The cause of the appearance of such variety of colours in the operation of your medicine, is from the extension of the blackness; for as much as blackness and whiteness be the extreme colours, all the other colours are but means between them. Therefore as often as any degree or portion of blackness descends, so often another and another colour appears, until it comes to whiteness.
~ The Root of the World, by Roger Bacon (Pseudo), 13-17th Cen.

[12] The matters then of the white and red, among themselves, differ not in respect to their essence; but for the red elixir needs more subtilization, and longer digestion, and a hotter fire in the course of the operation, than the white, because the end of the white work, is the beginning of the red work; and that which is complete in the one, is to be begun in the others.
~ The Root of the World, by Roger Bacon (Pseudo), 13-17th Cen.

[13] our stone is from one thing only, as is aforesaid, and it is performed by one act or work, with decoction: and by one digestion, or operation, which is the changing of it first to black, then to white, thirdly, to red
~ The Root of the World, by Roger Bacon (Pseudo), 13-17th Cen.

[14] look not upon the multitude, or diversity of names, which are dark and obscure, they are chiefly given to the diversity of colours appearing in the work.
~ The Root of the World, by Roger Bacon (Pseudo), 13-17th Cen.

[324] Therefore saith Bonellus, when you see the blackness of the water to appear, be assured that the body is made liquid.
~ The Root of the World, by Roger Bacon (Pseudo), 13-17th Cen.

[325] This blackness the philosophers call the first conjunction; --- for then the male and female are joined together, and it is the sign of perfect mixtion.
~ The Root of the World, by Roger Bacon (Pseudo), 13-17th Cen.

[326] Avicen saith, that heat causeth blackness first, in a moist body; then the humidity being consumed, it putteth off or loseth its blackness; and as the heat increaseth, or is continued, so it grows white.
~ The Root of the World, by Roger Bacon (Pseudo), 13-17th Cen.

[383] that part of the body which is dissolved, ever ascends or rises to the top, above all the other undissolved matter which remains yet at bottom. Therefore saith Avicen, that which is spiritual in the vessel ascends up to the top of the matter, and that which is yet gross and thick, remains in the bottom of the vessel.
~ The Root of the World, by Roger Bacon (Pseudo), 13-17th Cen.

[445] Therefore saith Rhasis, be very diligent and careful in the sublimation and liquefaction of the matter, that you increase not your fire too much, whereby the water may ascend to the highest part of the vessel. For then wanting a place of refrigeration, it will stick fast there, whereby the sulphur of the elements will not be perfected. For indeed in this work, it is necessary that they be many times elevated, or sublimed, and depressed again. And the gentle or temperate fire is that only which completes the mixture, makes thick, and perfects the work.
~ The Root of the World, by Roger Bacon (Pseudo), 13-17th Cen.

[446] The happy prosecution of the whole work, consists in the exact temperament of the fire; therefore beware of too much heat, lest you come to solution before the time, viz., before the mater is ripe; for that will bring you to despair of attaining the end of your hopes.
~ The Root of the World, by Roger Bacon (Pseudo), 13-17th Cen.

[447] Close up well they vessel, and pursue to the end. For there is no generation of things, but by putrefaction, by keeping out the air, and a continual internal motion, with an equal and gentle heat.
~ The Root of the World, by Roger Bacon (Pseudo), 13-17th Cen.

[448] This then is the thing, that the vessel with the medicine be put into a moist fire; to wit, that the middle or one half of the vessel be in a moist fire, or balneo, of equal heat with horse-dung, and the other half out of the fire, that you may daily look into it.
~ The Root of the World, by Roger Bacon (Pseudo), 13-17th Cen.

[536] The dissolution by dew, or balneum roris, is, that you take the glass vessel with the medicine in it, and hang it in a brazen or copper pot, with a narrow mouth, in which there must be water boiling, the mouth of the vessel being in the mean season shut, that the ascending vapours of the boiling water may dissolve the medicine. But note, that the boiling water ought not to touch the glass vessel, which contains the medicine, by three or four inches, and this dissolution possibly may be done in two or three days. After the medicine is dissolved, take it from the fire, and let it cool, to be fixed, to be congealed, and to be made hard or dried; and so let it be dissolved many times; for so much the oftener it is dissolved, so much the more strong, and the more perfect it shall be. Therefore Bonellus saith, when the aes, brass, or laten is burned, and this burning many times reiterated, it is made better than it was; and this solution is the subtilization of the medicine, and the sublimation of the virtues thereof.

So that the oftener it is sublimed and made subtil, so much the more virtue it shall receive; and the more penetrative shall the tincture be made, and more plentiful in quantity; and the more perfect it is, the more it shall transmute. In the fourth distillation then, it shall receive such a virtue and tincture, that one part shall be able to transmute a thousand parts of the cleansed metal into fine gold or silver, better than that which is generated in the mines. Therefore saith Rhasis, the goodness or excellency of the dissolution and fixation of the perfect medicine. For so much the oftener the work is reiterated, so much the more fruitful it will be, and so much the more augmented. So much the oftener you sublime it, so much the more you increase it; for every time it is augmented in virtue, and power, and tincture, one more to be cast upon a thousand; at a second time upon ten thousand; at a third time upon one hundred thousand; at the fourth time upon a million. And thus you may increase its power by the number of reiterations, till it is almost infinite. Therefore saith Mercedes the philosopher, know for certain, that the oftener the matter or stone is dissolved and congealed, the more absolutely and perfectly the spirit and soul are conjoined and retained. And for this cause, every time the tincture is multiplied, after a most admirable and inconceivable manner.

Our medicine is multiplied by fermentation; and the ferment for the white is pure luna, the ferment for the red is pure fine sol. Now cast one part of the medicine upon twenty parts of the ferment, and all shall become medicine, elixir, or tincture; put it on the fire in a glass vessel, and seal it so that no air can go in or out, dissolve and subtilize it, as oft as you please, even as you did for making of the first medicine. And one part of this second medicine, shall have as much virtue and power, as ten parts of the former.
~ The Root of the World, by Roger Bacon (Pseudo), 13-17th Cen.

[537] The philosophers therefore made three proportions, divers manners of ways, but the best proportion is this: let one part be cast upon an hundred parts of mercury, cleansed from all its impurities; and it will all become medicine, or elixir; and this is the second medicine: which projected upon a thousand parts, converts it all into good sol, or luna. Cast one part of this second medicine upon an hundred of mercury prepared, and it will all become medicine, and this is the third medicine, or elixir of the third degree, which will project upon ten thousand parts of another body, and transmute it wholly into fine sol or luna. Again, every part of this third medicine being cast upon an hundred parts of prepared mercury, it will all become medicine of the fourth degree, and it will transmute ten hundred thousand times its own quantity of another metal into fine sol or luna, according as your fermentation was made. Now these second, third, and fourth medicines may be so often dissolved, sublimed, and subtilizated, till they receive far greater virtues and powers, and may after the same manner be multiplied infinitely.
~ The Root of the World, by Roger Bacon (Pseudo), 13-17th Cen.

[581] there is no true generation, but of things agreeing in nature. So that things be not made but according to their natures. The elder or oak trees will not bring forth pears; nor can you gather grapes of thorns, or figs of thistles, things bring not forth, but only their like, or what agrees with the in nature, each tree its own fruit.
~ The Root of the World, by Roger Bacon (Pseudo), 13-17th Cen.

[582] Thus the wise man does that by art in a short time, which nature cannot perform in less than the revolution of a thousand years. Yet notwithstanding, it is not we that make the metal, but nature herself that does it. --- Nor do or can we change one thing into another; but it is nature that changes them. We are no more than mere servants in the work.
~ The Root of the World, by Roger Bacon (Pseudo), 13-17th Cen.

[598] This is a great and certain truth, that the clean ought to be separated from the unclean; for nothing can give that which it has not. For the pure substance is of one simple essence, void of all heterogeneity; but that which is impure and unclean, consists of heterogene parts, is not simple, but compounded (to wit of pure and impure) and apt to putrefy and corrupt. Therefore let nothing enter into your composition, which is alien or foreign to the matter, as all impurity is; for nothing goes to the composition of our stone, that proceedeth not from it neither in part nor in whole. If any strange or foreign thing be mixed with it, it is immediately corrupted, and by that corruption your work becomes frustrated.
~ The Root of the World, by Roger Bacon (Pseudo), 13-17th Cen.

[638] For the knowledge of this art consisteth not in the multiplicity, or great number of things, but in unity; our stone is but one, the matter is one, and the vessel is one. The government is one, and the disposition is one. The whole art and work thereof is one, and begins in one manner, and in one manner it is finished.
~ The Root of the World, by Roger Bacon (Pseudo), 13-17th Cen.

[741] Therefore saith Rhasis, pursue your business incessantly, beware of instability of mind, and too great expectations, by a too hasty and precipitate pursuit, lest you lose your end.
~ The Root of the World, by Roger Bacon (Pseudo), 13-17th Cen.

[770] it is cast out upon the dunghill as a vile thing, and is hidden from the eyes or understandings of ignorant men. [...] The philosophers’ stone is converted from a vile thing, into a precious substance;
~ The Root of the World, by Roger Bacon (Pseudo), 13-17th Cen.

[784] The vessel for our stone is but one, in which the whole magistery or elixir is performed and perfected; this is a cucurbit, hose bottom is round like an egg, or an urinal, smooth within, that it may ascend and descend the more easily, covered with a limbeck round and smooth every where, and not very high, and whose bottom is round also like an egg. Its largeness ought to be such, that the medicine or matter may not fill above a fourth part of it, made of strong durable glass, clear and transparent, that you may see through it, all the colours appertaining to, and appearing in the work; in which the spirit moving continually, cannot pass or fly away. Let it also be so closed, that as nothing can go out of it, so nothing can enter into it; [...] And though the philosophers oftentimes say, that the matter is to be put into the vessel, and closed up fast, yet it is sufficient for the operator, once to put the said matter in, once to close it up, and so to keep it even to the very perfection and finishing of the work.
~ The Root of the World, by Roger Bacon (Pseudo), 13-17th Cen.

[810] But the heat of this dry fire ought to be double at the least, to what it was before, or than the heat of the moist fire, by the help of this heat, the white medicine receiveth the admirable tincture of the redness. [...] Therefore you must burn it without fear in a dry fire, until such time as it is clothed with a most glorious red, or a pure vermilion colour. For which cause Epitus the philosopher saith, decoct the white in a red hot furnace, until such time as it be clothed with a purple glory. Do not cease, though the redness be somewhat long, before it appears. For as I have said, the fire being augmented, the first colour of whiteness will change into red. Also when the citrine shall first appear, among those colours, yet that colour is not fixed. But not long after it, the red colour shall begin to appear, which ascending to the height, your work will indeed be complete. As Hermes saith in Turba, between the whiteness and the redness, one colour only appears, to wit, citrine, but it changes from the less to the more. Maria also saith, when you have the true white, then follows the false and citrine colour; and at last the perfect redness itself. This is the glory and the beauty of the whole world.
~ The Root of the World, by Roger Bacon (Pseudo), 13-17th Cen.

[825] decoct the male and the (female or) vapour together, until such time as they shall become one dry body; for except they be dry, the divers or various colours will not appear. --- For it will ever be black, whilst that humidity or moisture has the dominion; but if that be once wasted, then it emits divers colours, after many and several ways.
~ The Root of the World, by Roger Bacon (Pseudo), 13-17th Cen.

[826] And many times it shall be changed from colour to colour, till such times as it comes to the fixed whiteness. Synon saith, all the colours of the world will appear in it when the black humidity is dried up. But value none of these colours, for they be not the true tincture: yea, many times it becomes citrine and reddish, and many times it is dried, and becomes liquid again, before the whiteness will appear.
~ The Root of the World, by Roger Bacon (Pseudo), 13-17th Cen.